The Drop Zone: 2018-19 Premier League Preview

Back for the start of the Premier League season, The Drop Zone gives the full rundown on what was a pretty tightly packed offseason. We chat about the effects of the World Cup on players and teams, the oddity of the new, shorter transfer window, and the lack of planning that seemed to dominate the business done by many of the teams in the league. We talk about some of the major player and manager moves, and what those implications are for the upcoming season. Finally, we give our predictions for the bottom 3 and top 6.

Contact us on Twitter at @doctorgc or @zachosterman, and stay tuned for our next episode, coming in early September.

Cosmic America 37: LA Woman by The Doors

We’ve reached the end of our Doors odyssey — we’re not doing the non-Morrison albums that followed this one, and we’re also not doing American Prayer for reasons that should be obvious if you listen to any of those titles. But that’s okay, because this is a tremendous high point upon which to leave. LA Woman, released in 1971, represented a sort of full circle for the band, who returned to more spontaneous studio performances after the perfectionism of the previous three albums. The songs are even bluesier than those on Morrison Hotel, and the album contains two bona fide rock and role classics.

If you enjoy these and other Cosmic America podcasts, be sure to subscribe to Cosmic America on iTunes or Stitcher, and consider reviewing the podcast on either of those sites. Tell your friends, and let us know what you think via social media — you can catch us at @doctorgc and @akmccarthy.

Cosmic America 36: Morrison Hotel by The Doors

We’ve entered 1970, and The Doors are back in the critical spotlight with their penultimate album, Morrison Hotel. Both a critical and fan favorite, this album saw The Doors moving (mostly) away from the pop and psychedelic sounds that dominated their last couple of albums, in favor of a rawer blues-influenced rock and roll sound. We take you track-by-track through the album, from the rollicking opener “Roadhouse Blues” through the ending of “Maggie M’Gill”.

Cosmic America reviews artists and their records, and we do it by going album-by-album through their careers. Be sure to subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher.

Cosmic America 35: The Soft Parade by The Doors

Back we are, tackling the fourth (and easily most controversial) album in The Doors’ canon. The Soft Parade, released in mid-1969, represented a pretty big departure from the band, and…well, the critics didn’t dig it. Like, at all. They hated the horns and strings on some of the songs, they hated the lyrics in places, and they seemed to have a significant amount of Morrison fatigue going on, after some of Jim’s on-stage and in-press shenanigans over the previous couple of years. So the critics slagged the album and that was that. Or was it? Was this album really so problematic, or just a victim of bad timing and bitchy music journalism? We dive in and go song-by-song through the entire album.

Cosmic America 34: Waiting For The Sun by The Doors – PLUS bonus review of Celebration of the Lizard

On our 34th episode, we reach the midway point of The Doors discography, reviewing 1968’s “Waiting For The Sun”. Significantly different in character from the previous two albums, this piece of work is a bit less coherent, a bit more muddled, yet still shines through with several excellent tracks and an intriguing departure from the sound they’d developed to this point. We also take a listen to the infamous studio version of “Celebration Of The Lizard”, the whole-side would-be epic that garnered so little traction among the producer and band members not named Jim that they decided to shelve almost the entire thing.

Cosmic America reviews artists and their records, and we do it by going album-by-album through their careers. Be sure to subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher.

Cosmic America 33: Strange Days by The Doors

Back for round 2 of The Doors’ discography, Galen and Alex tackle their sophomore effort, Strange Days. An interesting mix of late 60s psychedelia, guitar/organ pop sensibility, and another grand epic of a song, this album unfortunately has gotten a bit lost in the historical shuffle. But not here! We walk you through each track song-by-song, and also take some listener questions via Twitter and Facebook.

Be sure to subscribe to Cosmic America on iTunes or Stitcher, and consider reviewing the podcast on either of those sites. Tell your friends, and let us know what you think via social media — you can catch us at @doctorgc and @akmccarthy.

Cosmic America 32: The Doors by The Doors

Cosmic America’s raison d’etre is reviewing interesting music by interesting artists — and doing it in a completist fashion, by reviewing all of their studio albums in chronological order. It’s what separates Cosmic America from other music review podcasts that only tackle individual albums.

For this episode, we launch into the music of The Doors, starting with their seminal debut album. Consistently ranked as one of the best albums of all time, it’s obvious that this collection of songs made a huge impact on the American (and rock and roll) music psyche. But is it actually good? Does it hold up over 50 years later? We deep dive into each song on this episode, and answer some reader mail.

You can contact us on Twitter at @akmccarthy or @doctorgc. Be sure to subscribe to Cosmic America, and give us a nice rating if you’re feeling motivated.

Cosmic America 31: A Deeper Understanding by The War on Drugs

We’re at the end of The War on Drugs —- at least, until they release another album! (Which, god help us, should absolutely happen, but probably won’t until like 2021 or so)  Anyway, here’s their (for the moment) last album, A Deeper Understanding. The production’s a bit thicker, the melodies are catchier but less desperate-sounding, and the flow of the album is better than the excellent Lost in the Dream. Is this a winner all the way through? We go through it song-by-song, so you’ll be able to judge right along with us.

Cosmic America is a podcast about music, hosted by Galen Clavio and Alex McCarthy. Feel free to hit us up on Twitter @doctorgc and @akmccarthy with ideas, suggestions, and questions.

Cosmic America 30: Lost in the Dream by The War on Drugs

We’re back with more music talk. Cosmic America rolls on through the discography of The War on Drugs, tackling their breakthrough hit, Lost in the Dream for this episode. We take a look at the increasingly mature and almost gauzy production values, the increasingly isolated lyrical content, and the exciting yet somewhat uneven pacing of this 60-plus minute musical odyssey.

You can contact us on Twitter at @akmccarthy or @doctorgc. Be sure to subscribe to Cosmic America, and give us a nice rating if you’re feeling motivated.

Cosmic America 29: Slave Ambient by The War on Drugs

Back for more Cosmic America, as we continue our deep-dive into The War on Drugs. This LP, entitled Slave Ambient, broke The War on Drugs more fully into the national consciousness, featuring many of the key characteristics that made their music so interesting and attractive to so many people. We cover it track-by-track, giving anecdotes and details for all of the songs.

Be sure to subscribe to Cosmic America on iTunes, and give us a positive rating if you’re feeling charitable. Cosmic America is recorded and produced by Galen Clavio and Alex McCarthy. You can reach us on Twitter at @doctorgc or at @akmccarthy.